Family

24. CAPITOL HILL & CAREER CHANGE 

By |2021-01-14T02:44:29+00:00January 14th, 2021|Lloyd Johnson|

HATCH ACT REFORM  The federal Hatch Act of 1939, prohibiting federal employees from participating in partisan political activities, was intended to ensure a fair and impartial federal civil service. In 1975, in an effort to loosen those limitations, my new boss, Congressman William L. “Bill” Clay, introduced legislation to reform the Hatch Act.  It was designed to remove all restrictions on off-duty political activity by federal employees.   Enactment of the legislation was the primary focus of Congressman Clay’s subcommittee on Employee Political Rights; proponents and opponents quickly fell into place. Supporters included organized labor, civil rights groups, and most Democrats. Opposing the bill was the business community, a few good-government groups, and most Republicans.   My job? To oversee the drafting of countless proposed amendments to the original bill and to be the liaison with countless interest groups both for and against the legislation. I was [...]

4. Troubles & Mixed Blessings

By |2020-08-25T18:09:27+00:00August 24th, 2020|Lloyd Johnson|

My Truth: My Journey to Servant Leadership Ma c. 1985 Los Angeles, CA To say that Ma and Dad didn’t get along is an understatement. Yes, they both loved us unreservedly, but their frequent verbal altercations, though never becoming physical, scarred us all. They seemed to argue almost incessantly, at all hours. More than once, in the wee hours of the morning, I was awakened by their loud, bitter arguments. I have no idea what their arguments were about. I know that Dad liked to play the numbers [...]